Juneteenth Virtual Celebration: From being OWNED to BLACK BUSINESS OWNERSHIP

Jacksonville
Sat, Jun 19, 2021, 11:00 AM (EDT)

With the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, most of the United States celebrated the end of African American slavery. But, after the announcement, because certain owners refused to release their slaves, total freedom did not arrive for all those held captive until June 19, 1865. That symbolic date became known as Juneteenth, freedom from slavery to black business ownership.

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About this event

With the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, most of the United States celebrated the end of African American slavery. But, after the announcement, because certain owners refused to release their slaves, total freedom did not arrive for all those held captive until June 19, 1865. That symbolic date became known as Juneteenth, representing African American freedom from indentured servitude, and it laid the groundwork for the origin of Black business ownership.

Although there have been Renaissance eras of flourishing Black-owned industry, such as the Greenwood District in Tulsa Oklahoma, dubbed “Black Wall Street” in the early 20th century, today systemic racism continues to negatively impact access to funding for Black entrepreneurs and business owners. This financial disenfranchisement diminishes Black wealth creation and undermines economic productivity on a national scale.

George Floyd’s murder sparked national outrage and fueled a laser-focused spotlight on racism; it also created an opening to potentially level the playing field in terms of careers, business funding and business ownership.

As noted in a recent Brookings.com’s article entitled “This Juneteenth, we should uplift America’s Black businesses”:

“Given the vulnerability and lack of investment for Black- and Black-woman-led businesses, we must create national investment goals that include government and private investors. These goals would bring attention to this shared priority, guiding business owners, private investors, and government agencies on removing structural barriers while building capacity for Black-owned firms across the country. Doing so would increase Black income and wealth, boost local hiring, and anchor neighborhood revitalization…

…Who gets to own property is unquestionably tied to our past and our future as a country. Juneteenth reminds us that the quest for freedom is central to Black people’s legacy—but it should also be a cue to the business community that we must continuously invest in that freedom by advancing Black-owned businesses.”


Our Virtual Juneteenth Celebration Agenda:

Entertainment of the Arts Spoken Word Poet 

Love Reigns a renowned spoken word artist - Jacksonville, FL

History of Emancipation Proclamation in relation to Juneteenth

Adonnica Toler, African American Historian and Museum Administrator of The Ritz Theatre and Museum in Jacksonville, FL

Celebrating with Food

Virtual Cooking Demonstration + Q&A with Chef Tyrese S. Gamble of Chef T's Crafted Eatery - Mobile, AL

Panel Discussion Black Ownership

Dr. Wendy Norfleet - Leadership, Nonprofits, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Shunte Gamble - Entrepreneurship, Nonprofit, Media Mogul of Streaming Global Radio: Mixed Talk Radio

LaToisha Hall - Real Estate Expert in residential and commercial ownership

Special Guest: The Clean Comedy Queen:  Alisa Cody aka The Chillogist 

Join us from wherever you are to learn more about Juneteenth and how to support Black-owned Businesses

Article reference: 

  https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2020/06/18/this-juneteenth-we-should-uplift-americas-black-businesses/


 

Speakers

Panelists

When

Saturday, Jun 19
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM (EDT)

Brought to you by

  • Therese W Gamble

    Therese W Gamble

    CRPC Consulting LLC

    Founder & Chapter Director

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Brought to you by

  • Dr. Lascelle A. Sweetland

    Dr. Lascelle A. Sweetland

    Laspainc

    Founder and Managing Director

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